Oct
02
2014

safari254:

Day 2 didn’t start off too well, we all overslept including Seronei, our driver. It was one of those mornings where I heard my alarm but I was so deeply asleep I thought the alarm was part of my dream.

The drive from Kitale to West Pokot was exhausting to say the least. It was a 1.5 hour drive to Makutano to pick up our location scout, Simon (aka Pokot’s finest, I kid you not) after which we proceeded to Kacheliba.

We then had to endure an even longer drive to Kacheliba on a dirt road that has a section called ‘Slow’. That alone should tell you how bad the road was. It is a dirt road frequently used by huge trucks ferrying sand and is best tackled in 4WD drive vehicle.

Oct
02
2014

5centsapound:

Émilie Régnier: Mali Passport

via foam: ‘I am really driven by the idea of showing a West African society that is growing,’ says Régnier. That means ignoring the easy and the rote: pictures of elites quaffing champagne, or images cataloguing the atrocities of war. Witnessing with a camera takes many forms. For Régnier, photographic truth is located in the bodily presence of young West Africans proudly negotiating their future, a diverse future of many possibilities.’

Oct
02
2014

yagazieemezi:

Folasade: 1953 Pop-up Shop

You were first introduced to Folasade through our interview with her for How I Wear My Crown where we talked about her store and mission to preserve her father’s memory.

Serving as the creative director for her own wares, Folasade brings to us this fantastic look book showcasing some of her handmade designs. Shot by Brooklyn-based photographer Dex R. Jones, popular for his breath-taking work with black bodies.

See more

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Oct
02
2014

Three times she had prayed to the earth for advice, and three times she was left in the dark. In the fourth moon, she dreamed of a raven flying around her sore womb, a spider crawling up her leg, and the pain of years to come weighing on her back. When Morgana woke up, she prayed no more. 
Ravens meant battle and death, what kind of omen could be more terrible than that?

Three times she had prayed to the earth for advice, and three times she was left in the dark. In the fourth moon, she dreamed of a raven flying around her sore womb, a spider crawling up her leg, and the pain of years to come weighing on her back. When Morgana woke up, she prayed no more.

Ravens meant battle and death, what kind of omen could be more terrible than that?

Oct
02
2014
goddesswithinyou:

"We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.”~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression. From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’.
(Courtesy: Spiritual Ecology)

goddesswithinyou:

"We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.

They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.

Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.”

~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression. 

From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’.

(Courtesy: Spiritual Ecology)

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