Oct
21
2014
realsmurk:

Edward Wilmot Blyden born 3 August 1832 in St Thomas, Danish West Indies (now known as the US Virgin Islands), to Free Black parents who were of the Igbo tribe from present-day Nigeria.

realsmurk:

Edward Wilmot Blyden born 3 August 1832 in St Thomas, Danish West Indies (now known as the US Virgin Islands), to Free Black parents who were of the Igbo tribe from present-day Nigeria.

Oct
21
2014
everydayafrica:

Denis Akagha, having his hair cut, was caring for his pregnant fiancé, who died of Ebola. He also caught it, but survived. “I survived, you can too! Get help early, Drink plenty of ORS, Believe you will survive!”- Dennis Akagha. Photo by andrew esiebo @andrewesiebo for WHO #who #ebola #andrewesiebo #dennis #akagha #lagos #nigeria

everydayafrica:

Denis Akagha, having his hair cut, was caring for his pregnant fiancé, who died of Ebola. He also caught it, but survived.
“I survived, you can too!
Get help early,
Drink plenty of ORS,
Believe you will survive!”- Dennis Akagha. Photo by andrew esiebo @andrewesiebo for WHO #who #ebola #andrewesiebo #dennis #akagha #lagos #nigeria

Oct
21
2014
cavetocanvas:

Elizabeth Catlett, Mother and Child, 1944
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

The famous sculptor Elizabeth Catlett has also been a prolific printmaker throughout her long career. This compact image of mother and child embracing looks, in fact, as if it could have been carved from wood or stone. Taking advantage of the various tonal gradations produced by the lithographic process, Catlett articulates the planes of the mother’s head with deep shadows and bright highlights. The subject of maternal love and protection is one that the artist has repeated many times in both sculpture and prints. The pose of mother and child (indeed just the mere subject itself) immediately calls to mind religious representations of Mary and the Christ child. But to Catlett, this imagery had a secular meaning, which she wrote about in 1940: “The implications of motherhood, especially Negro motherhood, are quite important to me, as I am a Negro as well as a woman.”

cavetocanvas:

Elizabeth Catlett, Mother and Child, 1944

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art:

The famous sculptor Elizabeth Catlett has also been a prolific printmaker throughout her long career. This compact image of mother and child embracing looks, in fact, as if it could have been carved from wood or stone. Taking advantage of the various tonal gradations produced by the lithographic process, Catlett articulates the planes of the mother’s head with deep shadows and bright highlights. The subject of maternal love and protection is one that the artist has repeated many times in both sculpture and prints. The pose of mother and child (indeed just the mere subject itself) immediately calls to mind religious representations of Mary and the Christ child. But to Catlett, this imagery had a secular meaning, which she wrote about in 1940: “The implications of motherhood, especially Negro motherhood, are quite important to me, as I am a Negro as well as a woman.”

Oct
21
2014
humansofnewyork:

"He makes me want to know about little things, so that I can teach him. Like when we sit by this lake, I wish I knew what kind of turtle that was, so I could tell him. And I want to figure out what kind of duck that is, so I can tell him all about it the next time we come.""What do you want most for him?""Whatever his dreams are, I’m down to ride for him.""What’s your biggest fear for him?""That he won’t try. If he doesn’t try, I’ll be hurt. Cause then we’ll never know how far he’d get."

humansofnewyork:

"He makes me want to know about little things, so that I can teach him. Like when we sit by this lake, I wish I knew what kind of turtle that was, so I could tell him. And I want to figure out what kind of duck that is, so I can tell him all about it the next time we come."
"What do you want most for him?"
"Whatever his dreams are, I’m down to ride for him."
"What’s your biggest fear for him?"
"That he won’t try. If he doesn’t try, I’ll be hurt. Cause then we’ll never know how far he’d get."

Oct
20
2014

mgangalee:

socksandbedsheets:

I was having a conversation with my friends about what we see as a compliment and what we would be offended/not impressed by. To prove that being called cute meant being called small or being complimented in a friendly way I searched cute woman. To my surprise (not really) only white women were in my results, I thought it might’ve been a fluke and googled the other words we discussed… same thing. I know i’ve seen these google searches before, but trying it for myself really gave credibility to what many people have spoke on.

This sheds some perspective on what and why we perceive european features as ‘beautiful’. They’re all thats represented.

What does “ugly women” return?

^